DIY: How to Build Your Own Chicken Coop

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt
Chicken coops are getting really popular in both rural and urban areas. There are so many benefits to starting your own. The chickens are entertaining pets that can also help teach lessons of responsibility to kids and grown ups alike. The eggs they yield are so much healthier and tastier than most eggs you can buy in the store. Chickens can help reduce waste in your household. The fruit and veggie left overs that you would normally throw out can be great food for your new pets. You can also add chicken droppings to your compost to make your garden green. Here area few tips to help you get started:

  • When it comes to building a chicken coop, be creative. There are an endless amount of supplies you can use. This is a great time to up-cylce.
  • As far as the sizing of your coop, be sure to allow enough space. Generally, 2 to 3 sq. ft. per chicken is a good amount. Also, make sure that humans can fit into the space so you’re able to clean and care for the clutch.
  • You’ll need a separate area for feeding, roosting, and laying eggs. For cleanliness sake, leave enough distance between the food and roosting spot to keep manure out of the feed.
  • You need at least 1 nesting box for every 4 or 5 chickens. Place the box a few feet off of the ground and fill the bottom with straw. (12x12x12 is a good size)
  • One of the most important aspects of a coop is keeping your brood safe. Make sure the walls, doors, and windows are impenetrable to predators.
  • Good air circulation is key. Either use strong fencing for the walls or have a few windows with strong wire over it. That way air can move around, but critters can’t get in and out.
  • Chickens like dust baths. For this, all you need is a large litter pan. Fill it with wood ash and they’ll have a blast.
  • If winters get below freezing where you are, investing in heaters is a good option.
  • Decide which breed you want. Here are a few productive types: Leghorns, Rhode Island Reds, Australorps and Orpingtons.
  • Clean the coop regularly and enjoy the fresh eggs!

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