Ranchers Lilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz

Lilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz: best friends, fellow fiddlers, and Montana natives lead beautiful ranching lives. Lilly is 5th generation from Gallatin County and Morgan is 4th generation from Beayerhead County. Both are rooted deep in family ties and find their peace behind the reigns. Lilly and Morgan have been riding for as long as they’ve been able (on the ranch, that translates to around 4 years old). They are independent, strong, and skilled.

Lilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz in Montana / Crafted in CarharttLilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz in Montana / Crafted in Carhartt

“I have been through a large chunk of the West and do love a lot of other places, but Montana is definitely special. I cuss it every winter when it’s 30 below and I want to ride, but between the people, sense of community, beautiful country, and my family’s connection here, I can’t imagine how different my life would be if I hadn’t grown up here.” -Lilly Brogger

Lilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz in Montana / Crafted in CarharttLilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz in Montana / Crafted in Carhartt

Lilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz in Montana / Crafted in CarharttLilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz in Montana / Crafted in Carhartt

“It isn’t unusual for me to be the only woman at brandings, gathering cows, etc., and because my mom is so capable and that was just the norm, it wasn’t until I was 20 or so that I stepped back and realized how amazing the example she set for me is. I have never seen my gender as a limiting factor, which is common in ranching families, because women are expected to work too. However, there are plenty of men in agriculture as well who will try to do your job for you because they are so traditionally minded that they can’t see how a woman could do a man’s job. Nothing feels better than having a better horse, roping better, or being more helpful than that man that looked down on you. My attitude about this no doubt comes from my mom. She has never been a self-proclaimed ‘feminist’ but I now realize that she embodies everything that a capable woman should. She can fix fence and then cook an amazing meal at the end of the day, which is what ranch women are about. And the coolest part about it is that she has never pointed to gender as a factor, she simply does things. It’s really hard to respect yourself when you are actively having to remind yourself to do so, which is what a lot of women do because they didn’t have an example like my mom. My mom engrained it in me so I don’t have to think about it. Even though I am not doing daily ranch work right now, this has served me in so many ways in my life. I have a significant other that treats me like an equal, my peers respect me, I treat myself with respect, I’m not afraid to ask for what I want…the list goes on and on. My dad married my mom because she is so capable, which makes me feel very lucky” -Lilly Brogger

Lilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz in Montana / Crafted in Carhartt

“One of the biggest misconceptions I deal with is people come to Montana and they think this is a state full of “big rich farmers and ranchers” when really that couldn’t be further from the truth. Production agriculture is a tough career to jump into and most of us that are in it don’t do it for the money I can tell you that. We do it because our families did it and we love the lifestyle. There is a lot of risk in production agriculture. The weather, politics, and society drive the price for our product and it is totally out of our control. Agriculturalist have a thankless job. We work our fingers to the bone and hardly ever turn a profit- in fact it is often lots of us operate at a loss but we pick ourselves up- stretch last year’s income a little further, and pray that next year’s crop prices are better. We do all of this while continually being criticized by today’s society and the kicker is- most of the people who criticize us wouldn’t even last a day working along side us. Producers owe their everything to the land and the animals they raise. We would never take that blessing for granted. That food in the grocery store came from average people like me and the Brogger family and a lot of that stuff may have even come from Montana. We are the number 1 producer of lentils in the nation and we are in the top 10 for beef production.” -Morgan Kuntz

Lilly Brogger and Morgan Kuntz in Montana / Crafted in Carhartt