Visiting Marfa

Crafted in Carhartt traveled to far west Texas to bring you the stories of some amazing women. Marfa was my home base that week. It’s a quiet little desert town, with a population just under 2,000 people. Marfa has many old tales to tell–during the 1800s it served as a watering stop. Now it’s a major stomping ground for art lovers. With such an aesthetic appeal, it’s easy to see why.

Marfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in CarharttMarfa, Texas / Crafted in Carhartt

Stay tuned, more stories to come.

Art Shack Brooklyn

The Artshack in Brooklyn is a women-owned-and-operated ceramics studio. It was founded in 2008 by McKendree Key and Dany Rose. We got to spend the day with a few of the artists who teach and make there including Laura Protzel, Alayna Wiley, Zena Pesta, and Ash Donnelly.

“Artshack is a community-based not-for-profit ceramics center. We use our creative skills to helps kids hone their own ideas. We then collaborate with our students to fabricate molds, and create casts of their work to sell in our shop. 100% of the profits from those casted replicas sold goes towards raising money for scholarships for kids to take art classes. We believe that all kids deserve access to quality arts education and strive to make that readily available to young artists in Brooklyn.” –Ash Donnelley of @artshackbrooklyn

The Artshack Brooklyn / Crafted in CarharttThe Artshack Brooklyn / Crafted in Carhartt

Alayna Wiley is a ceramicist, an art educator, and a craft curator. When she’s not working at The Art Shack, she’s a studio assistant at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her education is impressive and extensive. She’s studied at Oberlin College, Germantown Academy, and Harvard University to name only a few. Visit her website to take a closer look at her work.

The Artshack Brooklyn / Crafted in Carhartt

“When I was a teenager, my wildest dream was to move to New York City to become a practicing ceramics artist and a fighter for social justice. I could only dream of running a nonprofit community ceramics art space in my neighborhood, I had been told by so many people that such a job didn’t exist. My advice to young women who want to make a difference in others’ lives or want to be artists, is to always push yourself to keep making things. Never allow yourself an excuse, we as women are never too weak to do or be anything we desire. Be confident in what you believe and what you want, and always consider the ways you can use your creative practice to make a difference in someone else’s life.” –@ashdonnellyceramic of The Art Shack in Brooklyn 

The Artshack Brooklyn / Crafted in Carhartt

“ArtShack has a really unique atmosphere. There is a strong community here of adults and children making art. Adults are inspired by the kids and vice versa. It was through this community that I found my own interest in clay. It sort of just fell into my lap, I am so glad it did. 

I have been at ArtShack for about a year. I am currently the Director of the Kids Program. I design the curriculum and teach the weekday kids courses… 

I am a 31 year old kid, so kids truly are my people. The best part of my job is getting closer with these young artists and learning from them. Kids have incredibly insightful perspectives on the world around them, that they bring to their ceramic creations. I feel so lucky to spend my days with a wonderful community of artists of all ages especially in these turbulent times.” –Laura Protzel of @artshackbrooklyn 

The Artshack Brooklyn / Crafted in Carhartt

“I’ve been working in Ceramics for 15 years! I had a very thorough education in ceramics at my undergrad in Cleveland, Ohio at the Cleveland Institute of Art under William Brouillard and Judith Salomon. So thorough, that the Pratt Institute hired me straight out of undergrad to run their Ceramics Department. At Pratt i taught undergraduate and graduate level courses, it was a great place to continue to pursue and share the alchemy of clay and glazes through chemistry and experimentation. While at Pratt I took time to travel to Jingdezhen China and participate in a Ceramic residency at the Pottery Workshop. This place is the incredibly wild porcelain capital of the world; 2.8 million people working in ceramics. The magical dirt of clay has also taken me to Australia where a great concentration of potters live!” -Zena Verda Pesta of @orangepopsiclesandle

The Artshack Brooklyn / Crafted in CarharttThe Artshack Brooklyn / Crafted in Carhartt

The Artshack offers classes to children and adults. If you’re interested in learning more about hand building, wheel throwing, glazing, plaster mold making or slipcasting—head on over to @artshackbrooklyn for more info.

Visit http://www.artshackbrooklyn.org/kidstest/ to sign up for kid classes & visit http://www.artshackbrooklyn.org/adults/ to sign up for adult classes. 

Woodworker Alexandra Climent

Meet woodworker Alexandra Climent. She operates out of her own shop in Brooklyn. Her passion for the extraordinary wood she found in the jungle lead her to teach herself the trade.

Woodworker Alexandra Climent / Crafted in Carhartt

This is her story in her own words: 

“In college I worked for a marine construction company as their account manager and secretary…I noticed that there was a certain type of wood that was in high demand for marine work…I started to research where this special wood came from. It turned out there was a reason why it wasn’t widely available; it was difficult to get because it came from a small country in South America, which I later found was very hard to communicate with. 

I ended up going down to the jungle with the construction company fully supporting the idea of me finding the wood they needed and purchasing it directly from me. It was an intense struggle to find suppliers and there were many dangerous things that happened while in the jungle. 

I started falling in love with the idea of bringing back the wood for myself and discovering it’s beauty in some way. I wanted to to do it sustainably, as I wanted the wood both to be visually beautiful, but also beautiful in the way that it had lived it’s full life. Locals loved the idea and got excited by helping figure out ways to do this. 

Once I managed to get an order together for a full container back to the states, I realized I had something really special. I had no idea at the time how to woodwork and because of the density of the wood, I didn’t even know how to make cuts without breaking blades. 

When the wood finally arrived, it would be months that turned into almost 2 years of me researching and driving around trying to find help to cut the wood I had worked so hard to find. I still had a full time job and would take my days off and drive all over to woodshops and mills asking if they could help me cut this wood. All of them said no. 

I ended up having to do it myself and so far each aspect of this learning process of woodworking I have learned and taught to myself. I think a lot of people thought I would never be able to do it, but I never gave up. Now, after many years in the making, I’m able to finally make pieces that are very close to my heart that also showcase the beauty that I saw when I was down in jungle.” –Alexandra Climent 

Woodworker Alexandra Climent / Crafted in Carhartt
“The wood I use is some of the most dense in the world. When you put it in the water it sinks and termites can’t even penetrate it. It’s like working with steel, and it breaks pretty much any blade.” -Alexandra Climent

Woodworker Alexandra Climent / Crafted in Carhartt

Woodworker Alexandra Climent / Crafted in Carhartt

All of the products Alexandra Climent makes are set apart from other pieces constructed of wood. She sustainably sources her materials from the jungle, befriending locals and working with each regions’ governments along the way. The wood she harvests and brings back to her wood shop in Brooklyn is ancient, densely packed over years and years. Note the grain and hue in her finished pieces shown above. To see more of her work, visit her website: www.sustainablysliced.com/shop.

“My advice would be not to wait around to find the perfect class or the perfect moment to start woodworking. You just have to jump into it, even if it’s little by little. I was working for a retail company and would find time to practice on my days off, no one considered me a woodworker then, but I was because I was practicing and progressing…even if it was slowly. It doesn’t matter what you do, just find a little bit of time to start.” -Woodworker @alexandracliment

Woodworker Alexandra Climent / Crafted in Carhartt

Woodworker Alexandra Climent / Crafted in Carhartt
“Living in NY is great. I was born here so I’m quite used to all the obstacles. I’m lucky because I have managed to find a great wood shop to work in that’s not far from where I live. It’s s rugged, dirty and dusty place and I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Woodworker Alexandra Climent / Crafted in Carhartt

When people told Alexandra Climent that what she wanted to do was impossible, she just kept plugging away. Her determination and problem solving set her work apart. The ancient woods she brings back from the jungle are unlike anything most of us have ever seen. It’s so dense, saw blades can only make it through a few cuts before breaking against the age-old grain. The deep pigments, saturated into the rings over time, tell a rich story. 

As she travels to the jungles of South America, her deepest hope is to share this rare beauty that nature bestowed in those particular regions. Her efforts to preserve and promote all that those forests have to offer are encouraging. As humans, we can appreciate and use what the earth gives us without harming our surroundings in the long run. 

Woodworker Alexandra Climent / Crafted in Carhartt
“Shire is my adopted hound mix mutt and he’s my best friend. I pretty much bring him with me everywhere.” -Brooklyn Woodworker Alexandra Climent

 

The Women of Iron Maiden Welding

Iron Maiden Welding, a small business in Bozeman, Montana, is owned and operated by Brenda Gayer. She’s been selling her work since she was 16 years old, and has now developed her brand into one of a kind, colorful works of art.

“Get out there and do it! Get a job where you can learn as much about it as possible. Even if you start at the bottom and work your way up. You can never learn enough.

Like anything, (welding) has its ups and downs. Attitude and confidence are the key. If you go into a situation with the ‘I got this!’ outlook, it doesn’t matter if you are a man or woman. Stay true to you! Be confident! Be confident!” -Welder Brenda Gayer

The Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in CarharttThe Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in CarharttThe Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in CarharttThe Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in CarharttThe Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in CarharttThe Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in CarharttThe Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in CarharttThe Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in CarharttThe Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in Carhartt

Tiffani, who’s been working with her for 2 and a half years, loves the job and hopes to create a small business of her own some day.

“I have been welding for 8 years now, and High School is where I discovered my passion for it. Welding was interesting to me, because it is something that has been a part of my family for generations. My father’s got his first job as a welder following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. I figured it was the perfect thing for me to try that was different and challenging.

I recommend that all young people try welding if they have the opportunity, or find some sort of trade that they find enjoyable and can be skillful at. Welding has given me a lot of job opportunities, and I think it is something especially women should try.

What I love about welding most is that it gives me the ability to express myself and be different, because not a lot of people I meet can do what I do.” -Welder Tiffani Eccleston

The Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in Carhartt

The Women of Iron Maiden Welding / Crafted in Carhartt

Click here to find out more about Iron Maiden Welding.

Welder Jen Mosier

“It was a total accident that I found a love for welding. I trace it back to a metalsmithing class in undergrad. I was still thinking about metal years later, but when I transferred to The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, I found that all the metalsmithing classes were full. The only other way into metalworking was a class about building a furnace for pouring iron. It was a big leap, but that’s where I got acquainted with the large machines and tools, as well as welding. Thankfully a few patient students and professors—now some of my good friends—helped me understand the basics of those tools. I went from working on jewelry on a very small scale to the opposite end of the spectrum. I still make some jewelry, but welding big stuff is my jam.

Welding is empowering. It forces you to consider the physics of moving heavy steel, while often navigating confined spaces. You have to be clever, independent and you have to trust yourself. There’s a grittiness to welding that comes with the territory, and you have to be adaptable to do the work. I’m not afraid to stand on the table to find a more precise position to weld.

Females in traditionally male-dominated fields have to be double tough. I know several other women who weld, and they all have a story about how they have to work extra hard just to earn the respect of their male counterparts. For my master’s thesis, I wrote a small handbook on how to become a female metalworker, and I got to interview some of these badass women welders, fabricators and sculptors. You might think that female welders sit around and chat about their experiences as women in these fields, but that’s not really the case. These interviews were the first time I heard their stories of struggle, which inevitably led to triumph because they chose to ignore the negative commentary and just get the job done. For some of the more competitive women, they let those comments fuel their fire to complete the work.

For anyone looking to get into welding, I’d say just go for it. For women, there’s a unspoken required tenacity. Depending on the shop leadership, there could be a bit more to deal with than just completing projects. A few guys discouraged me from learning how to weld because of the potential danger of electric shock or burns. I let the idea of getting shocked sink in so much that I believed it was more dangerous than it really is. Nonetheless, you still have to be careful around the equipment and always pay attention to your surroundings. In the end, having some of that fear rewards you to do everything right and safely.” -Jen Mosier

Welder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in CarharttWelder Jen Mosier / Crafted in Carhartt

“I’ve heard so many women say they are afraid of welding, and I wish that wasn’t the case. Depending on the project, welding can be quite straightforward. Granted, there’s more to know about welding than just how to wear the gear and turn on the machine. There’s a technical side which involves clamping and building jigs, which is where things start to get interesting. Everyone should know there is a high level of satisfaction in working with metal and shaping it into something functional” -Jen Mosier

Don’t miss out on the Lady Welder’s Handbook Jen put together.

Bo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks

“I’ve been officially working with wood since 2013 when my partner, Kyle, and I launched our company Woodward Throwbacks.

My dad is a general contractor back in New York and when I was younger I used to go on some of the sites with him. I believe that is when I truly became fascinated with the idea of being able to design and build.

I started re-purposing found wood back in college but it became a serious hobby once I met Kyle. We used to bike around the city exploring different neighborhoods and during our excursions we noticed an abundance of wood from illegal dumping sites. We combined our love for the city and the idea that taking materials found in the street would also help clean our neighborhoods.

We are inspired by memes and daily life. When it comes to brain storming, it usually involves a few beers and tons of laughter. Coming up with new designs is our way of team building. We don’t take our design process too seriously and I think that is what makes our product so memorable and relatable.

My favorite product is our bottle openers, because it was our very first product. Now we are expanding and have the capabilities to customize branding designs for our retailers and corporate clients.”

-Woodworker Bo Shepherd of @woodwardthrowbacks

Bo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in CarharttBo Shepherd of Woodward Throwbacks / Crafted in Carhartt

Beth Beverly of Diamond Tooth Taxidermy

Beth Beverly is a state and federally licensed taxidermist, operating out of her studio in Philadelphia. She graduated from the Pocono Institute of Taxidermy in 2010 with high marks. Beth is an avid animal lover and preserver. Everything she works on has a distinct, fashionable flair. Take a look at her website to see even more of her wearable art.

“It’s important to me that I communicate my sincere love and respect for animals through my craft. I really do pour my heart into every piece, and I can honestly say that there are literally blood, sweat and tears embedded into every mount.” — Philadelphia’s premier couture taxidermist, Beth Beverly

Taxidermist Beth Beverly / Crafted in Carhartt

Taxidermist Beth Beverly / Crafted in CarharttTaxidermist Beth Beverly / Crafted in CarharttTaxidermist Beth Beverly / Crafted in CarharttTaxidermist Beth Beverly / Crafted in CarharttTaxidermist Beth Beverly / Crafted in CarharttTaxidermist Beth Beverly / Crafted in Carhartt

Hear what’s it’s like to be a taxidermist from Beth in this short clip.

DIY Pegboard Storage

As an artist and a crafter, I love having my most used tools and accessories within arm’s reach. That’s why I love these pegboard organizers I created in just 8 easy steps. Follow along to make one for yourself.

You’ll need:

  • 1/2 in. x 2 ft. x 2 ft. Wooden Project Panel
  • Pencil
  • T-Square
  • Sand Paper
  • 3/4 in. x 48 in. Wooden Dowel
  • Drill
  • 3/4 in. Spade Bit
  • Miter Saw
  • 1/2 in. x 4 in. x 4ft. Wooden Plank
  • Hanging Fixtures

PegBoardStorageDIY2

Step 1: With a pencil and T-Square, create a grid with vertical and horizontal lines across your project panel every four inches.

PegBoardStorageDIY3

Step 2: Using the 3/4 in. Spade Bit, drill a hole into the project panel at each intersection of lines on the grid.

DIY Peg Board Storage / Crafted in Carhartt

Step 3: Carefully sand the wood around each hole so it’s smooth and erase your pencil markings.

DIY Peg Board Storage / Crafted in Carhartt

Step 4: With the miter saw, cut several 5 inch and 3 inch segments from the wooden dowels. They will serve as pegs and shelf holders.

Step 5: Cut the plank in half with the miter saw. These pieces of plank will serve as shelves.

Step 6: Attach the hanging fixtures onto the top back corners of the wooden panel.

DIY Peg Board Storage / Crafted in Carhartt

Step 7: Insert the pegs into the project panel and place the shelves on top of the shelf holders.

DIY Peg Board Storage / Crafted in Carhartt

Step 8: Hang the pegboard and it’s ready for use!

DIY Peg Board Storage / Crafted in Carhartt

DIY Peg Board Storage / Crafted in Carhartt

Bowhunting Tips From Tessa Wyatt

This is Tessa Wyatt. She lives in Park City, the wonderland for outdoor adventurers. She’s been bowhunting since childhood and has a few words of advice to share to anyone taking up the sport:

  • Get comfortable with your set up and your stance.
  • Confidence is a must.
  • Having the right weight on your bow makes a huge difference too. If you’re tiring quickly or struggling to get stillness and accuracy in your shot it’s likely that your draw weight is too heavy.
  • You want to be able to pretty comfortably bring the nock of the arrow to middle of your cheek/edge of your mouth while keeping your stance strong and relatively square.

Bow and Arrow / Crafted in CarharttBow and Arrow / Crafted in CarharttBow and Arrow / Crafted in Carhartt

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