Faina of Popps Packing in Detroit

Popps Packing and Carhartt
Popps Packing and Carhartt
Popps Packing and Carhartt
Popps Packing and Carhartt
Popps Packing and Carhartt
Popps Packing and Carhartt

If you know of vacant meatpacking plant in your neighborhood, you might consider converting it into a home and workspace. At least it worked out really well for the Detroit-based artists Faina Lerman and Graem Whyte. In 2007, the painter and performance artist, and her husband (a sculptor and architectural dabbler) seized the opportunity to buy the former Popps plant (later known as a cookie factory) built in the 1930s and rebirthed it into a bustling art center in the city’s Hamtramck neighborhood. Hamtramck is a culturally diverse city within a city. It was originally settled by German farmers, followed by a flood of Polish immigrants in the early part of the 20th century. Over the past thirty years a large number of immigrants (Yemenis, Bengali, Macedonian, Turkish, and Russian) to name just a few have taken up residence in Hamtramck along with a growing tide of young creative entrepreneurs. Since 2009, Graem and Faina have hosted seasonal indoor/outdoor installations, exhibitions and performances in the building where they also live in with their two young children. Popps Packing is not only a home and studio, it’s also an experimental arts venue aimed at promoting dialog and cultural exchange between the local, national and international communities through exhibitions, performances, workshops and artist residencies. In 2011, the duo purchased a house (Poppa Joe’s Guest House) and a house/storefront (Popps Emporium) across the street, further activating neglected spaces on the border of Detroit and Hamtramck, while providing additional housing and exhibition space for visiting artists. In 2012, they started a residency program that includes studio practice, research, architectural interventions and alternative systems projects. Popps Packing has been a self funded enterprise since it’s inception, relying on the resourceful handiness of Faina and Graem, lots of time/labor/material donations from their friends, odd jobs from clients, and small scale fundraising to keep things moving.

See what Faina’s wearing here: Carhartt Women’s Coleharbor Hoodie, Clarksburg Zip-Front Sweatshirt, Original-Fit Jasper JeansSandstone Kenai Parka, C-Grip Knuckler Gloves, and Carhartt Women’s Rapid City Utility Work Apron

Building Hugger Amy Nicole Swift

Building Hugger - Crafted in Carhartt
Building Hugger - Crafted in Carhartt
Building Hugger - Crafted in Carhartt
Building Hugger - Crafted in Carhartt
Building Hugger - Crafted in Carhartt
Building Hugger - Crafted in Carhartt
Building Hugger - Crafted in Carhartt
Building Hugger - Crafted in Carhartt

Recycling and reusing building materials is the ideal way to go about repairing old houses and architecture. In a time when so much excess waste proliferates, as strong proponents of green construction arise, they need our support. Amy Nicole Swift is just that. When she’s not teaching at the university, she’s working to restore vacant Detroit properties. It’s a dirty and exhausting job, but crucial to rebuilding this iconic city. She founded Building Hugger, an architectural design-build firm, to give back to the community and breath new life into old spaces.

Check out Amy’s spring time work gear: Carhartt Mountrail Jacket, Force Performance Quarter-Zip Shirt, Sibley Denim Shorts, Soft Hands Gloves, and Wellington Boots

 

Meet Kelly Pepper and Kelly McDermott of Habitat for Humanity

MINNEAPOLIShabitatFORhumanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Meet Kelly Pepper and Kelly McDermott. Both girls are originally from Texas, so we had common ground right at the start. Working in Minneapolis can be a bit chillier than what we’re used to, but that’s alright when you’re bundled up in the right clothes. Pictured above is the Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity Women’s Build Team. That’s where women from across the world help build homes for others in need. Pretty cool if you ask me. These two girls blew me away with how much they knew about construction. It’s all about working from the ground up. You might feel overwhelmed in the beginning, but it’s a learning process every day.
Kelly Pepper is a Construction Volunteer Facilitator and has lived all over the world. She stumbled across the job, and figured she’d give it a go since she’d never been to Minnesota. Kelly loves working with her hands, community development, and helping others, so the job has been a great fit. Kelly McDermott is a ABWK Volunteer Facilitator. It’s a lot of hard labor, tedious, and tiring tasks that add up to such great fulfillment to a huge need. Kelly mentioned that she hoped to merge the work experience she’s gained from construction with her degree in the arts into something that can inspire, empower, and support others. If you ask me, she’s doing it already. The team pours so much of their soul and time into these homes. The craftsmanship of construction is such a beautiful art form, especially when it is mixed with the goodness of a giving heart. See how you can get involved in a Women’s Build. Let’s strive to be a community of women that seek to strengthen one another instead of competing or pulling each other down.

Kelly Pepper’s outfit: Carhartt Women’s Quick Duck Woodward Jacket, Women’s Force Performance Quarter-Zip Shirt, Women’s Series 1889 Slim Double Front Dungaree, & Acrylic Watch Hat / Kelly McDermott’s outfit: Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Berkley VestWomen’s Force Performance Quarter-Zip ShirtWomen’s Series 1889 Slim Double Front Dungaree, & Women’s Quincy Hat 

Kiersten and Suandra of Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Habitat for Humanity and Carhartt

Meet Kiersten and Suandra. Both girls work for Habitat for Humanity in Washington DC. This is no job for the weak or those with a fear of heights. From scaling scaffolding and roofs to wielding saws and sledgehammers, these girls have it covered. It’s encouraging to see such skill and confidence being given back to the community. See how you can lend a helping hand here.

check out what the girls are wearing: Double Front Sandstone Pants, Signature Tee, Norfolk Tank, Force Performance Shirt, Annapolis Shirt, Fargo Jacket, & Rockford Windbreaker

Alissa Ruppert of NAWIC Detroit

NAWIC Detroit and Carhartt

NAWIC Detroit and Carhartt

NAWIC Detroit and Carhartt

NAWIC Detroit and Carhartt

NAWIC Detroit and Carhartt

NAWIC Detroit and Carhartt

NAWIC Detroit and Carhartt
NAWIC has created a community for women in construction to connect with one another. Alissa Ruppert, an electrical estimator and director of the organization, is proud to carry on the family legacy. Her grandmother, Myrt Hagood, is one of the founding members of the NAWIC Detroit chapter. It’s really cool to see women in the same fields sticking together. It’s a girls’ world! Let’s show them who’s boss!

shop Alissa’s look here: Norfolk Henley, Tomboy Hooded Vest, Curvy Fit Basic Jean

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

Dedham19

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

Carhartt in Dedham

I’m in Boston to do some stories on a few inspiring women in the area. I can’t wait to share them with you in the following weeks. It’s been a great trip so far— my first time in this neck of the woods. I got to spend the day in Dedham, right outside of Boston yesterday. The Carhartt store in Legacy Place is incredibly interesting. Most of the materials that make up the space are reclaimed lumber. Boats and boat frames are suspended from the ceiling, and beautiful boat drawings and plans cover the walls. There’s even a pool table in the middle of the store for the shoppers who want to chill for a bit. Stay tuned for the upcoming posts about Boston women!