Meg Schrader of Wake Robin Farm

Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm in Central New York has been in the Schrader family for 40 years. They have grown from 4 cows to about 40. That might sound small to you, but as the Schraders say, “All farmers put their boots on the same way, are affected by the weather, and work hard to make a living. We believe that there are more similarities than differences among farms, regardless of size.”

To be perfectly honest, there were a number of things that stuck out to me as I watched Meg perform her daily milking routine one crisp evening. Despite the many similarities between dairy farms, large and small alike, there are some undeniable benefits of shopping small and local.

  • The Schraders love their cows. They’re like pets—friends even. You can virtually meet them here. Trust me, these cows are loved and cared for with great attention to detail.
  • The milk goes from udder to jug in less than 18 hours. Now that is fresh!
  • The Schraders make small, handmade batches of yogurt and cheese from their cows’ milk. Take a look at the different varieties, and yes—cheese curds made the list.

Most people get their milk from a grocery store, who more than likely get it from a large dairy farm. Maybe it’s time to do some research and find the best way to shop local in your area. Support small farmers and families who devote their lives to creating quality products honestly, all while loving their plot of earth and animals. It’s a great way to impact the landscape around your community and preserve farmland.

Meg is wearing: Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Mock Neck Vest, Huron Shirt, Austel Hat, & Series 1889 Slim Double-Front Denim Dungaree.

Carhartt Force

The Color of Force / Crafted in CarharttWe can all rejoice. Spring is finally here! Goodbye gray skies, hello colors of the rainbow! After such a long, chilly winter, it’s a great time to celebrate with gardening or a new craft you’ve been putting off. Get outside. Start a few projects. Sweat a little. Carhartt Force Performance Quarter-Zip is the ideal work shirt for times like these. It fights odor, wicks sweat, and has stain breaker technology. For those spring showers, Carhartt Rain Defender is the way to go. The Rockford Windbreaker is lightweight and water repellant. It’s lined, hooded, and a sharp piece to add to your work wardrobe. The Force Equator Hat is not only a Force item, but also water repellant with Rain Defender technology. You’ll stay dry as it repels water, wicks sweat, and prevents stains. Now go ahead and get your color on, folks!

Come Snow or High Water

Winter Jacket / Crafted in Carhartt
PUREmichigan4
Winter Jacket / Crafted in CarharttThe winter of 2015 has been a fierce one to be sure. Regions unfamiliar with snow have been pelted with it, and those already accustomed to snow have put up with it to an even greater degree. I’ve been reading The Farmer’s Almanac, learning about today in weather history.

This day in 1918, a car crossed frozen Penobscot Bay, Maine.
In 1952, an ocean storm hit Cape Cod and Nantucket, with winds of 61 mph.
In 1980, Norfolk, Virginia received 13.7 inches of snow.
In 1989, the temperature in Jacksonville, Florida plummeted to 24°F.
In 2008, San Antonio,Texas temperatures reached 92°F.
And in 2011, the temperature rose to 103°F in Laredo, Texas.

It’s easy to forget the times in our past when the weather has caught us off guard. The best thing is to always be prepared, come snow or high water. That’s why I like my Quick Duck® Jefferson Jacket. It’s water repellent and constructed with 3M Thinsulate material. Whether it’s snowing or pouring rain, you’ll stay dry and warm.

Trails of Hay and Sawdust at The Office: The Sure Sign of a Country Girl

Carhartt Fan Photos
Carhartt Fan Photos
WOMC Detroit radio personality, Holly Hutton, gets up early. That’s to be expected when you work the morning show. But when you have 6 horses, 5 chickens, 3 cats, a poodle, and a giant rabbit, a 3am wake up call is unavoidable. Holly leaves a trail of hay and sawdust behind her at the office, the sign a true animal lover.

Holly is wearing the Carhartt Women’s Zeeland Sandstone Bib.
(if you have a Carhartt fan photo you’d like to share, submit it to craftedincarhartt@carhartt.com)

Your Rain Jacket Dream Come True

Carhartt Rain Defender / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt Rain Defender / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt Rain Defender / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt Rain Defender / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt Rain Defender / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt Rain Defender / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt Rain Defender / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt Rain Defender / Crafted in Carhartt
On my trip to Montana, it rained quite a bit. I practically lived in the new Carhartt Women’s Cascade Jacket. It’s much easier to enjoy the sweeping views and wide open skies when you know your rainwear will keep you dry. This Storm Defender® waterproof breathable jacket comes with articulated elbows so you can easily move around, a left-chest map pocket that’s certain to keep its contents drip-free, interior cuffs with thumbholes for those extra inches of protection, and an adjustable hem with drawcord and barrel lock adjusters. It’s basically your rain jacket dream come true.

Carhartt Woodsman

Carhartt New Holland Beer / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt New Holland Beer / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt New Holland Beer / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt New Holland Beer / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt New Holland Beer / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt New Holland Beer / Crafted in Carhartt
Carhartt New Holland Beer / Crafted in Carhartt

Exciting news on the Carhartt front: New Holland Brewing in Michigan created a beer just for us! It’s crafted from locally grown Cascade hops and barrel aged into an American pale ale, with a hint of malty sweetness and toasted oak. The Carhartt team took a road trip all the way from Dearborn, MI to the Great American Beer Festival in Colorado. The photos above are from their pit stop at Subterranean in Chicago for a night of live music, good beer, and beer art. Let’s all raise a frothy glass to the 125 years that Carhartt has gratefully served the hard working men and women across the US; forged by sweat, grit, and sturdy gear.

what I wore: Carhartt Women’s Belton Shirt & Carhartt Women’s Series 1889 Sim-Fit Double Front Denim Dungaree (tune in for tomorrow’s post to see this outfit in action) 

Tips for Beginning Barrel Racing

Carhartt Women and horses

Carhartt Women and horses

Carhartt Women and horses

Carhartt Women and horses

Carhartt Women and horses
Carhartt Women and horses

Carhartt Women and horses

Carhartt Women and horses

barrel racing tips from Carhartt

Meet Brittany Baton, an extraordinarily talented barrel racer from East Texas. She’s the southern girl next door with a close knit family and a drive to compete in the arena. When you’ve been riding since the ripe old age of two, you get to be pretty comfortable in the saddle. Watching Brittany run barrels you can see how natural and at home she feels there. Her advice to beginning barrel racers is to “always have an open ear for anyone that knows more than you do. Listen to their advice and try to use it because you can never learn too much.”

check out Brittany’s riding gear here: Carhartt Weathered Wildwood Jacket, Hamilton Flannel Shirt, Calumet Long-Sleeve V-Neck, & Carhartt Slim-Fit Jeans

DIY: WIRE WORDS

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Valentine’s Day can be a very divisive topic. You love it or you hate it. It does feel like a very commercial holiday that pointlessly makes us buy tons of things covered in little pink and red hearts and end the night with a self-indulgent candy binge. I’ve never been a fan of store bought cards or heart-shaped chocolate boxes. But boy do I love a good old fashioned handcrafted sentiment. That’s why these wire words are the perfect craft for this time of year. Give them as a gift or simply use them in your own home as decoration. This year, make something from the heart to remind those you hold dear how much they mean to you. Go ahead, state the obvious.

“The most important things to say are those which often I did not think necessary for me to say- because they were too obvious.” -Andre Gide

take a look at my crafting outfit: Script Logo Tee, 1889 Double Front Dungaree, & Sandstone Berkley Jacket

 

DIY: How to Build Your Own Chicken Coop

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt

chickens and Carhartt
Chicken coops are getting really popular in both rural and urban areas. There are so many benefits to starting your own. The chickens are entertaining pets that can also help teach lessons of responsibility to kids and grown ups alike. The eggs they yield are so much healthier and tastier than most eggs you can buy in the store. Chickens can help reduce waste in your household. The fruit and veggie left overs that you would normally throw out can be great food for your new pets. You can also add chicken droppings to your compost to make your garden green. Here area few tips to help you get started:

  • When it comes to building a chicken coop, be creative. There are an endless amount of supplies you can use. This is a great time to up-cylce.
  • As far as the sizing of your coop, be sure to allow enough space. Generally, 2 to 3 sq. ft. per chicken is a good amount. Also, make sure that humans can fit into the space so you’re able to clean and care for the clutch.
  • You’ll need a separate area for feeding, roosting, and laying eggs. For cleanliness sake, leave enough distance between the food and roosting spot to keep manure out of the feed.
  • You need at least 1 nesting box for every 4 or 5 chickens. Place the box a few feet off of the ground and fill the bottom with straw. (12x12x12 is a good size)
  • One of the most important aspects of a coop is keeping your brood safe. Make sure the walls, doors, and windows are impenetrable to predators.
  • Good air circulation is key. Either use strong fencing for the walls or have a few windows with strong wire over it. That way air can move around, but critters can’t get in and out.
  • Chickens like dust baths. For this, all you need is a large litter pan. Fill it with wood ash and they’ll have a blast.
  • If winters get below freezing where you are, investing in heaters is a good option.
  • Decide which breed you want. Here are a few productive types: Leghorns, Rhode Island Reds, Australorps and Orpingtons.
  • Clean the coop regularly and enjoy the fresh eggs!

Check out Jenny’s outfit here: Carhartt Women’s Rowlesburg Sweatshirt, Original-Fit Canvas Crawford Dungaree, & Longsleeve Signature T-Shirt 

DIY: Tips for Beginning Horseback Riding

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Tips for Beginning Horseback Riding
  1. Reach out to others. Horseback riding is a lot more fun with other people, and they have a lot they can teach you. The best way to improve is to listen to someone more knowledgeable than you, practice, and if possible, have them critique you. Never think that you can’t learn more. The easiest way to do this is by finding an instructor.
  2. Invest in a helmet. Make sure to get one that is ASTM/SEI-approved. This is one of the most important investments you can make. Horses are large and can be unpredictable, and that helmet can save your life.
  3. Wear the appropriate clothing. Long pants and boots are crucial. Bare legs can often lead to chaffing. Never wear open toed shoes. Boots are preferred because they give you traction and a slight heel can keep your foot from sliding around in the stirrup. Make sure the boots don’t have a steel toe. Check out Ellen’s riding outfit pictured above: Carhartt Women’s Briarwood Shirt, Marlinton Vest, & Original-Fit Canvas Crawford Dungaree.
  4. Introduce yourself to your horse. Make sure they can see you and that you don’t startle them. Extend your hand slowly towards his nose so he can smell you first. It’s like saying hello in horse language.
  5. Never assume that your horse is completely, 100% safe. No matter how trained he is or how well you get along, horses are prey animals first. They are going to act like that from time to time. It is better to always be ready than to assume everything will be fine. This is where that helmet can come in handy.
  6. Stay in open areas at first. Avoid low hanging branches, holes in the ground, and other obstacles until you’re more comfortable. The ball of your foot should rest in the stirrup. Hold the reins evenly with a slight bit of slack. Don’t hold the reins too tight, or you will hurt the horse’s mouth. Loosen up and let your body move with the horse. Keep your back straight and don’t hold your breath.
That sounds like a lot to remember, but just take things one step at a time. You’ll start to get the hang of it. You won’t be perfect overnight. Be patient with your horse and don’t forget to enjoy yourself.