DIY Interactive Tap Light Wall Instillation

My favorite kind of art invites folks to take part in it. These interactions allow people to let lose and get creative in a group setting. This tap light DIY is a great idea for a party activity or a small gathering.
You’ll need a fairly dark space, masking tape, sticky tabs, and a bunch of tap lights.
DIY Interactivec Tap Light Wall / Crafted in CarharttUsing the tape, delineate where you’ll stick the lights on the wall. Put the sticky tabs on the back of the lights and adhere them. The tape will also help with a speedy removal at the end of the night. Simply pull the tape off the wall and the tap lights will come off with it.DIY Interactivec Tap Light Wall / Crafted in Carhartt
Continue hanging the tap lights until you’ve used them all. You can create a large uniform group like I did below, or you can make more of an abstract pattern across the space.DIY Interactivec Tap Light Wall / Crafted in Carhartt
Now you’re ready to create designs in light! Have fun! DIY Interactivec Tap Light Wall / Crafted in CarharttDIY Interactivec Tap Light Wall / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Interactivec Tap Light Wall / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Interactivec Tap Light Wall / Crafted in Carhartt

15 Fall DIYs That Will Make Any Fall Lover Rejoice

15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY PUMPKIN BOWLS
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY APPLE CIDER IN APPLE CUPS
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY APPLE VOTIVES
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY CANDY CORN NECKLACE
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY CANDY CORN GARLAND
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY CANDY CORN T-SHIRT
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY STICK HEART
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY JEWELRY ORGANIZER
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY LEAF DECORATIONS
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY INFINITY LEAF SCARF
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY PUMPKIN SEED GRANOLA
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY PUMPKIN SEED TRAIL MIX
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY GIANT POMPOM BEANIE
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY ELBOW PATCHES
15 Fall DIYs / Crafted in CarharttDIY JACKET EMBROIDERY

Happy Halloween! What is it about fall that gets you in the crafting mood? I’ve put together a list of 15 seasonal crafts that can be just for fun, help bring life to a fall party, or add to any Thanksgiving celebration. The thing I like about the projects above is that they can be done on the cheap. Creativity mixed with a little elbow grease can go a long way.

1. DIY PUMPKIN BOWLS
2. DIY APPLE CIDER IN APPLE CUPS
3. DIY APPLE VOTIVES
4. DIY CANDY CORN NECKLACE
5. DIY CANDY CORN GARLAND
6. DIY CANDY CORN T-SHIRT
7. DIY STICK HEART
8. DIY JEWELRY ORGANIZER
9. DIY LEAF DECORATIONS
10. DIY INFINITY LEAF SCARF
11. DIY PUMPKIN SEED GRANOLA
12. DIY PUMPKIN SEED TRAIL MIX
13. DIY GIANT POMPOM BEANIE
14. DIY ELBOW PATCHES
15. DIY JACKET EMBROIDERY

DIY Rain Chain

Growing up with a creative mom is a great gift. Projects and DIYs have been a big part of our relationship over the years. You can bounce ideas off of each other and get to learn more about one another: from picking out materials to communicating and problem solving. I owe so much of my artistic inclinations to my mom. As a young girl I remember watching her, wide-eyed and enthralled by her abilities. This Rain Chain DIY is a great example of a simple craft that’s fun to do in pairs.
Take a look at my mom’s work wear: Carhartt Women’s Amoret Jacket, Clarksburg Zip-Front Sweatshirt, & Carhartt Women’s Austel Hat.

Take a look at my work wear: Carhartt Women’s Amoret Vest (which is reversible), Dunlow Sweatshirt, & Acrylic Headband.


DIY Rain Chain / Crafted in Carhartt
What you need: copper wire, recycled glass chunks or medium sized rocks, and wire cutters. I chose to use the glass because it allows light to pass through so beautifully, but if you have rocks or another item similar in size go ahead and get creative!
DIY Rain Chain / Crafted in Carhartt
Carefully wrap each chunk of glass or rock in copper wire. It helps to hold the glass steady with one hand as your dominant hand forms the copper wire around the object. Make sure to wrap it up enough times that the glass can’t fall out.
DIY Rain Chain / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Rain Chain / Crafted in Carhartt
Create a loop several layers thick at the top of the chain that can attach to a hook made of copper wire. This hook will eventually grab onto a tree limb so the rain chain can dangle in the air. Then hang the chain and watch as the rain trickles down.
DIY Rain Chain / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Rain Chain / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Rain Chain / Crafted in Carhartt

Good rain gear can only help in a project like this. The Amoret Jacket and the Amoret Vest have the Rain Defender® durable water-repellent finish. See how the water beads up so easily on the garment surface? You can wash your gear 20 times and it will maintain 70% of its strength.

Free Fall DIY-ing

Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt

Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt

There is so much to appreciate about fall: crisp air and crunchy footsteps, soft earthy tones and speckled foliage. It marks the start of bonfire season and cuddle-up in-warm-blankets season. I’m a big proponent of surrounding oneself with the great outdoors. That being said, it feels natural to pluck up a few flowers from the yard and put them in a vase, but what about leaves? They can be just as lovely, with free flowing branches and freshly turned hues. Why not give it a try? It’s a free way to decorate for the season and it challenges you to see the beauty in what most consider mundane.

what I wore: Carhartt Women’s Belton Shirt & Carhartt Women’s Series 1889 Sim-Fit Double Front Denim Dungaree 

 

 

 

Glass Artist Ona Magaro

Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt

Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt
Ona Magaro / Crafted in Carhartt

In a time when men outnumber women in films 3 to 1 on screen, unequal pay based on gender still unfairly affects females on a day to day basis, and social media and advertising outlets are repeatedly beating women down with unrealistic and often times contradictory expectations about beauty, health, and happiness; it’s time we stand together and let out stories and experiences bring about an era of change. Let’s applaud the women who are out there defying stereotypes and pushing forward in careers and fields where they are outnumbered. From one woman’s triumph shared to another’s inspiration spurred, small changes will amount to larger ones that can eventually redefine what it means to be a working woman.

Ona Magaro’s glass creations and her life story are quite the achievements to admire. She has turned her passion into a thriving business. After years of fine-tuning her craft, her work is breathtaking and unlike any I’ve seen. Take a look at the glass sculpture Ona created for us, from start to finish. She envisions the body of a bird by utilizing the simplicity of a single color and an elongated curve, free flowing and elegant. But don’t let the airy nature of her art fool you. It’s hard work, requiring a tremendous amount of physical strength and a heaping load of creativity. Her advice to anyone hoping to follow in her footsteps is to study marketing, accounting, and writing to build a successful business around the artistic talent.

As Oscar Wilde would say, we live in a world where “life imitating art” is an everyday occurrence. May Ona’s art and experiences be something that young women can look up to and hope to emulate as they grow and discover what path they’ll pursue. When I asked Ona what she wanted to teach her children about the arts, and how she hoped her work will affect the way they interpret the world around them, her simple response is what I hope to share with you, “That anything is possible.”

Ona’s workwear: Carhartt Women’s Long-Sleeve Signature T-Shirt, Women’s Series 1889 Slim Double-Front Dungaree, & C-Grip Knuckler Glove

last photo above taken by Jessie Moore

DIY: Wood Chiseling

After watching Aimee Inouye chisel away at the gorgeous bench she was working on last week, I was inspired to give woodworking a try. The first thing I discovered is that the type of wood you use matters. Wood comes in varying hardness and grains. If you’re a beginner looking for the perfect substrate, I’d suggest basswood or butternut. You can find blocks and panels at your local craft store or even larger hardware stores. Now as they say, practice makes perfect. So grab a few scrap blocks to practice with before you attempt the project at hand.
You’ll need a pencil, wood, a chisel set, and a rubber mallet. Take a look at the steps below. I’m drawn to a more handmade aesthetic, so I made my chisel marks pronounced and jagged to give it a personal touch. If that’s not your taste, be a bit tidier with your lines.

How to Chisel / Crafted in Carhartt
Now that you’ve gotten the hang of the basics, you can move on to the real thing. It’s always good to have a plan, so start off with a template of how you’d like the sign to look. Use that template to create a shallowly traced guide into the wood. Once you have your pattern, make deeper cuts. You may want to go over a the letters a few times to make the incisions thicker and deeper into the surface. Remember, it doesn’t have to be perfect. That’s the nature of handmade arts.

How to Chisel / Crafted in Carhartt
How to Chisel / Crafted in Carhartt
How to Chisel / Crafted in Carhartt
How to Chisel / Crafted in Carhartt

How to Chisel / Crafted in Carhartt

My crafting outfit: Carhartt Women’s El Paso Utility Jacket, Clarkston Cami Tank, Sibley Denim Shorts, & Carhartt Legacy 14″ Tool Bag. 

Bukola, MFA Applied Craft + Design Student

Bukola Paper Art BUKOLApaperART2
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt

Walking into Bukola’s studio space at the MFA Applied Craft + Design Program in Portland is like crossing the doormat into a treasured family room. Memories and swatches of inspiration dangle from the walls. Every bit of art is handcrafted with care and intent. You get the feeling that a story is begging to be unraveled. Many of the photographs displayed in Bukola’s workspace are of her family. It was clear to me that she draws much of her inspiration from them. Read from Bukola’s perspective how her path led her to this point:

“I come from a close and wonderful family. I grew up in Lagos, Nigeria with my parents, Adeyinka and Kolawole Koiki, and I am the oldest of my mother’s four children. I was always the arty kid growing up, always in a corner drawing pictures or making things. My parents didn’t quite know what to make of me I think, and while it was highly unlikely the kid of middle class Nigerians would end up being an artist, I was suddenly given the opportunity to come to the USA and attend school here to pursue that path. While it must have been hard to send your teenager off across the world on her own, I think my parents must have been relieved frankly, that I would finally get an outlet for my interests. They and my siblings have been nothing but supportive and I get so much inspiration from them because they are all creative in their own right.

My mother has a tailoring business and can make sewing patterns from scratch in minutes. My father is land surveyor and I’m pretty sure I got my eye for detail from him. My immediate younger brother, Tunde has fulfilled his long held dream of becoming a sportscaster on both radio and TV and is a hilarious mimic. The brother after him, Yemi, is currently pursing writing, producing, and performing music as a rap artist. Last but not least, the baby of our family, Busola, is a lawyer whose aptitude for leadership and problem solving is inspiring and is currently pursuing work in international law. I was raised by wonderful parents who managed to provide us with an interesting upbringing and a fantastic education from the little they had. It is my goal in life to honor their sacrifices for my siblings and myself by living the best and most successful life I can.

I originally landed in Texas straight from Nigeria. That was some culture shock I tell you! I first attended community college in Houston, and then transferred to the University of North Texas in Denton to attend their challenging Communication Design Program. I graduated with a BFA in 2006, worked in advertising for a while, but like many people, got laid off with the economic downturn.

I took the opportunity to go back to Nigeria for three whole months and fell in love with the tactility of life there all over again. While the Western notion of fast fashion and disposable commodities is slowly creeping in, there are still a lot of things that people make by hand in Nigeria. While at home, I renewed my deep appreciation for Nigerian textiles such as our wax prints, hand woven strip cloth (Aso Oke) and our indigo dyed cloth (Adire). I enjoy the tactile subtleties of different types of cloth and the graphic designer in me is obsessed with the color and patterns of surface designs.

When I came back to the US, I immediately started taking classes in sewing and bookbinding. In between freelance gigs I also worked at a paper goods store where I learned a lot about handmade paper from around the world. Thus my love for my other passion paper was born. I came to the Applied Craft+Design program because frankly I was not happy being another person pushing pixels around in an office.”

What a story indeed. Bukola and her family have made sacrifice after sacrifice so she could chase her dreams. That’s what we all want, isn’t it? We’re all driven by something: be it textiles and paper, crafting with our hands, or fueling that creative fire that burns in our minds. Muster together the courage to take the steps that get you just a bit closer to your goals. Like Bukola, maybe you can find a path to self-discovery mirrored in your roots and heritage.

Take a look at the photos above to see Bukola lead us through Momigami. This Japanese technique of kneading paper to create a pliable sheet of paper that can be used to make paper clothing, book covers, textile art and much more. Depending on the characteristics of the original paper, you can get a range of lovely end textures: everything from a soft cloth like feel to textures akin to leather.

What you need: newspapers (the more illustrations, diagrams, or patterns—the better), olive oil, a plastic sheet to protect your work area, a small brush, and PVA Glue (that’s an archival glue used in bookbinding and paper projects you can find at your local craft store)

DIY MOMIGAMI:
With your surface protected, pour some olive oil into a small bowl and scoop up enough to evenly coat your palms when you rub your hands together. Take your chosen sheet of paper and fold the four corners into the center, crumpling the dry sheet gently first into a loose ball and then slowly squeezing and wrinkly it carefully but firmly into a tighter ball.

To accelerate the distressing, you can use the slickness of the protective plastic to  “knead” the paper ball against your work surface. Unfold the sheet and repeat the wrinkling, crumpling and knead processor up to three or four minutes, stopping to coat your hand in more olive oil as needed. Open the sheet up and then rub it between your palms or flatten it out onto the work surface while rubbing the sheet down by applying pressure with your hands in an outward direction from the center of the sheet.

The crumpling, rubbing and stretching may be repeated as many times as you would like until you have achieved your preferred texture. Embrace any tears in the paper as opportunities for creativity. Individual sheets can be incorporated into textile art projects by machine sewing, hand stitching or using them in decoupage.

To create a large wall hanging piece instead, using a little brush, apply a thin layer of PVA (polyvinyl acetate) glue to the edge of your paper and adhere them together in a pleasing configuration. You can hang your creation from a wooden dowel rod or explore other creative hanging solutions like use vintage pant hangers.

*Please note that the kneaded paper will still be oily for a long while after, so you should hang your finished piece out and away from the wall to avoid oil stains.

Bukola’s work wear: Carhartt Women’s Huron Shirt, Calumet V-Neck T-Shirt, Slim-Fit Nyona Jean, & Acrylic Watch Hat

Leslie Vigeant of Material Rescue League

Trash into Art on Crafted in Carhartt
Trash into Art on Crafted in Carhartt
Trash into Art on Crafted in Carhartt
Trash into Art on Crafted in Carhartt
Trash into Art on Crafted in Carhartt
Trash into Art on Crafted in Carhartt
Trash into Art on Crafted in Carhartt

Trash into Art on Crafted in Carhartt

Visiting a city dump is an eye opening revelation to those who haven’t had an opportunity to see the path that waste follows once it’s left homes and businesses in the surrounding area. Endless piles of what most consider trash fill the gigantic rooms of the facility. Those heaps are destined to filtered, compacted, and shipped to the nearest landfill. The Portland dump has a different approach. They have programs that allow artists and others to sort through trash that has been safely filtered through the system so that they can recycle their finds. I saw plenty of things that could be reused and made new again as I made my way through the mountains of junk.
Just ask artist Leslie Vigeant. Her project the Material Rescue League incorporated her precious finds from the dump. Leslie collected non-recyclable items and rehabilitated them into boutique products. Take a look at the final photo posted above, with interesting colors and materials packaged and displayed with care, all in the name of art and making the world a better and cleaner place.
As the birthday of this nation rolls around, keep those in mind who go out of their way to preserve the beauty of America. Be motivated by strong women like Leslie, who aren’t daunted by piles of stinky trash. Find the beauty in everything and use a little elbow grease to help others see that beauty as well.

Take a look at Leslie’s work gear: Carhartt Women’s Minot Shirt, Clarkston Cami Tank, Relaxed-Fit Canvas Kane Dungaree, & Carhartt Women’s Quick Flex Glove. 

How to Reclaim Red Clay

How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt
How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt
How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt
How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt
How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt
How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt

How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt
How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt
How to Reclaim Red Clay // Crafted in Carhartt

 

As you may well know, Carhartt women are known for being innovative. So when it comes to craftiness, don’t be wasteful and think green. For those pottery lovers who want to be resourceful and re-use scrap clay, take a look at this tutorial Victoria from Pewabic Pottery is demonstrating above.

How to Reclaim Clay: (in other words, how to recycle dry clay bits back into a workable material)
1. Soak dry bits, chunks, failed projects of clay in water.
2. Soak for a few hours or days, depending on dryness of clay. Stir mixture with your hand.
3. Scoop out rehydrated clay onto plaster block.
4. Make sure clay is even thickness on the plaster block to allow for even water absorbtion.
5. Once clay is no longer tacky scrape it off the plaster block into a medium size pile.
6. Wedge it. Rock clay back and forth in kneading motion until air bubbles are compressed and clay feels pliable.

Victoria’s workwear: Carhartt Women’s Short-Sleeve Signature Tee & Slim Fit Nyona Jean

Where To Get Stuff Done: ADX

ADX Portland and Carhartt
ADX Portland and Carhartt
ADX Portland and Carhartt

ADX Portland and Carhartt

ADX Portland and Carhartt
ADX Portland and Carhartt

ADX Portland and Carhartt
ADX Portland and Carhartt
ADX Portland and Carhartt
ADX Portland and Carhartt

ADX Portland and Carhartt

 

ADX in Portland is a makers’ dream. It’s a 12,000 square foot facility filled with tools, space to work, and other like-minded folks. There’s a wood shop, metal shop, factory floor, and design lab; all equipped for pretty much anything you can dream up. All you have to do is get a membership, much like you would at the gym. That membership gives you access to the space, help from the staff, and the chance to sign up for on site classes. And when you need to a break or a caffeine fix, head on over the the cafe for a pick me up. 
Meet Yelena Prusakova. She’s an artist and member at ADX. Take a look as she puts together a frame for a poster in the wood shop. With her background in Industrial and Interaction Design and access to whatever she needs at ADX, Yelena can bring her inspirations and visions to life.

Check out Yelena’s work wear here: Carhartt Women’s Dunlow Sweatshirt, Women’s Calumet Crewneck Shirt, Women’s Relaxed Fit Canvas Kane Dungaree, & Women’s Quick Flex Glove.