Firefighter Emily Travis

Emily Travis / California Firefighter

This week, we’re tipping our hats to Emily Travis. She’s a full time seasonal firefighter in California.

“I began working as a full time seasonal firefighter in 2014 after finishing up my fire academy and EMT training. I’ve worked on an engine responding to wildland fires, structure fires, traffic accidents and medical emergencies. Summers are very long, and you often work through the months with no days off on the fires that burn in California. The job is tiring but very fulfilling and you become very close with the crew that you work with. We all work together often times through the night carrying heavy gear and hose up steam mountains with little sleep…my advice for young women getting into the fire service would be the same as for young men. Work hard, get an education, stay in shape and keep getting better. It’s a really fun job and has so many aspects that you can specialize in that really keep the job interesting you just have to see what that is.” -Emily Travis

When she’s not braving the wilderness, protecting the great state of California from the flames, she’s hard at work at Five Marys Farms in Fort Jones. It’s a beautiful spot in the Scott Valley with a population of just under 1,000 people. The area is a historical landmark, where many people carry on the traditions of the ranching community.

“Even though I didn’t grow up on a farm, I raised animals for 4-H &FFA. We bought our pigs in the spring time and had the responsibility of raising them for the show in August, then selling our animals for slaughter and figuring out our expenses versus what we sold the animal for and what we profited.

It’s a pretty common activity for kids here and it taught us a lot about hard work, the realities of life and death, where our food comes from and making an investment and seeing a return. At the time it was just normal but it really gave me a good basis of the importance of hard work.” -Emily Travis

Emily Travis / California Firefighter

Emily Travis / California FirefighterEmily Travis / California Firefighter

You can also see Emily featured in this tribute to all those who make Labor Day possible.

Jessica Ellis and Siobhan Beal of Growing Power in Chicago

Growing Power is a nonprofit urban agricultural organization that started in 1993. Jessica Ellis and Siobhan Beal work at the Iron Street location. Making healthy food affordable and accessible to all people is of top priority to the Growing Power team. Now with over 12 acres of farm land in the Chicago area, their reach is multiplying. On each of their farms, the crews trains the community to grow, process, market, and distribute food in a more sustainable way. To find out more visit their website.

GROWINGpower1Growing Power Urban Farm / Crafted in CarharttGROWINGpower4Growing Power Urban Farm / Crafted in CarharttGrowing Power Urban Farm / Crafted in CarharttGrowing Power Urban Farm / Crafted in CarharttGROWINGpower12Growing Power Urban Farm / Crafted in Carhartt

If you’d like to see even more images and videos, take a look at the Crafted in Carhartt instagram.

Meg Schrader of Wake Robin Farm

Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
Wake Robin Farm in Central New York has been in the Schrader family for 40 years. They have grown from 4 cows to about 40. That might sound small to you, but as the Schraders say, “All farmers put their boots on the same way, are affected by the weather, and work hard to make a living. We believe that there are more similarities than differences among farms, regardless of size.”

To be perfectly honest, there were a number of things that stuck out to me as I watched Meg perform her daily milking routine one crisp evening. Despite the many similarities between dairy farms, large and small alike, there are some undeniable benefits of shopping small and local.

  • The Schraders love their cows. They’re like pets—friends even. You can virtually meet them here. Trust me, these cows are loved and cared for with great attention to detail.
  • The milk goes from udder to jug in less than 18 hours. Now that is fresh!
  • The Schraders make small, handmade batches of yogurt and cheese from their cows’ milk. Take a look at the different varieties, and yes—cheese curds made the list.

Most people get their milk from a grocery store, who more than likely get it from a large dairy farm. Maybe it’s time to do some research and find the best way to shop local in your area. Support small farmers and families who devote their lives to creating quality products honestly, all while loving their plot of earth and animals. It’s a great way to impact the landscape around your community and preserve farmland.

Meg is wearing: Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Mock Neck Vest, Huron Shirt, Austel Hat, & Series 1889 Slim Double-Front Denim Dungaree.

Dairy Farmer Lori Kamerman

A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt
A Montana Dairy Farm / Crafted in Carhartt

Most people would consider an heirloom to be an old watch, a cherished book, or some loved trinket passed down from one generation to the next. But family treasures to the Kamerman’s look a little different than that. In fact, home looks a little different for them too.

Soft rolling Montana pastures, sprinkled with cattle and dirt roads make up their shared heirloom. The dairy farm where they live and work has been in the family for 70 years. Lori and her 4 daughters, Hannah, Mikaya, Malaya, and Mali run about doing their daily chores.

Cows aren’t generally pets, but they all have unique personalities. The two youngest Kamerman’s are quite proud of their cows and couldn’t wait to introduce me to the ones they’ve grown attached to. There is no doubt that the work all of the girls have done caring for the animals on their land has given them soft, loving spirits—in tune with others’ needs and feelings.

Lori’s advice for anyone on a growing farm is to “look past the day to day grind to the big picture, that is the reward you reap from a job well done. Also along the way try to enjoy the little things, such as that mother taking care of its newborn calf or the cow that wants her ears scratched.”

Call for All Fan Photos!

Crafted in Carhartt / Fan Photos
Crafted in Carhartt / Fan Photos

 

Take a look at this little Texan. Brennan is wearing Carhartt kids.
It goes to show that overalls look good at any age.

If you’re a Carhartt lover and you have a photo you’d like to share on the blog, 
email craftedincarhartt@carhartt.com and you could see your photo here. 

Chelsea Updegrove of Urban Farm Collective

Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Urban Farm Collective in Portland
Are you familiar with the Broken Windows Theory? It’s the idea that when a neighborhood begins to fall into disrepair, it jumpstarts a downward spiral for the entire community. That negativity spreads and leads to more decay and even crime. The good thing is that the opposite action of investing in your home and stomping grounds leads to further beautification in that area. That’s the driving force behind Urban Farm Collective in Portland. They transform unused land into neighborhood food gardens. This fosters community development, promotes education, and food security.
I got to follow garden manager, Chelsea Updegrove, around as she tended some of her daily tasks. It’s hard work, but it’s every bit fulfilling as it is demanding. Hours spent kneeling over rows of carefully planted seedlings, covered in dirt, call for clothing that wears mud well. Take a look at Chelsea’s work wear: Carhartt Women’s Minot Shirt, Sibley Denim Cropped Pant, Force Equator Jacket, Plaid Military Cap, and Rapid City Utility Work Apron.
I’ll leave you with a parting quote from Chelsea, “Peace, love, and carrots.”

Imani of Keep Growing Detroit

Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit and Carhartt
Keep Growing Detroit

 

There is a certain feeling of empowerment and resolve that come with sticking your own two hands in the soil and growing your own food. Dusting the dirt off your clothes after a hard day of work never felt so good. To watch your labor generate new life is almost as satisfying as taking a big bite out of a your fresh produce.

Spend some time with the folks at Keep Growing Detroit and you’ll know what I’m talking about. This non-profit organization makes it possible to grow fruits and veggies in the city limits for the people of Detroit. Their focus is to help residents create a healthy relationship with food, spread knowledge about growing and farming, and cultivate a sense of community.

After a few minutes of following Imani around as she worked in the gardens, I sensed her connection with the land. With experience and dexterity, she performed each familiar task as if she were having her daily conversation with the ground. The interdependent relationship between Mother Nature and those who harvest its potential is one that should be respected and never taken for granted.

Included above are some tips to starting your own garden. Take a look at some of Imani’s Carhartt gear that helps her get the job done: Carhartt Women’s Force Equator Jacket, Carhartt Force Performance Quarter-Zip Shirt, Original-Fit Canvas Crawford Dungaree, Wellington Boot, and Soft Hands Gloves