How Seasons Can Affect Horses

how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt

I don’t know about you, but this never-ending winter is getting to me. Have you ever wondered how seasons can affect your animals? I did a little reading on how the year’s changes can bring about certain transformations in horses. Here are some tidbits of what I learned:

Spring
expedites the growth of grass. Again, you’ll see spikes in potassium and nitrates. The warmer temperatures and damp conditions are prime for fungus producing myco-toxins. Watch out for Rye Grass staggers. With the increased grass, your horse can gain weight. Too much weight gain can put your horse at risk for type 2 diabetes. If you fear your horse is eating too much, a grazing muzzle may be your solution.

Summer climates allow grass growth to continue. Again, spikes in potassium and nitrates should be on your mind. Horses tend to be more relaxed during dry summers. Always have drinking water readily available. Just like humans, horses need more water on hotter days.

Autumn brings a big change in grass, often with lower sodium content and higher potassium and nitrate levels. Fungus can thrive during this season too, possibly producing myco-toxins. Take head if your horse is ill or starts to stagger. They may need to be moved to a safer spot with better conditions. When the soil is wet for a long period of time, your horse can feel tender footed after rain.

Winter slows the growth of grass, which will help lower levels of potassium and nitrates. In some cases, grass will even become dormant. Horses burn more magnesium during colder months. Make sure you are still providing the vitamins and minerals found in hard feed (especially calcium and magnesium).  Keep your horse warm and dry. Horse safe hay is great for this.

All in all, keep an eye on your horse for any changes in behavior. If you can make them more comfortable, do so. Make sure to seasonally adjust their diets so that they receive the nutrition they may lack at certain times of the year. Here’s to hoping spring comes swiftly, but for now you should bundle up.

Check out Alison‘s work wear here: Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Berkley Jacket, Dartford Denim Shirt, & Jasper Jeans

DIY: How To Muck Your Horse’s Stall

how to muck your horses's stall - crafted in Carhartt
how to muck your horses's stall - crafted in Carhartt
how to muck your horses's stall - crafted in Carhartt
how to muck your horses's stall - crafted in Carhartt
how to muck your horses's stall - crafted in Carhartt

Mucking is an important part of caring for your horse. A clean and healthy environment is crucial in their well-being. You will need a pitchfork, a broom, a shovel, and a wheelbarrow. Clean each stall once a day, twice if you can. The more often you do, the easier your job will be.
Ellen is wearing the perfect mucking outfit in the photos above. The Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Active Jac is ideal for chilly chores in the barn. It’s extremely durable and flannel lined. The Norfolk Henley is a comfortable cotton shirt and the Original-Fit Canvas Crawford Dungaree has a contoured waistline to prevent gapping as you move about and is slightly fitted through the hip and thigh.Now to the gritty details. Follow these steps:
  • Use a pitchfork to sift through the bedding to weed out the manure.
    When cleaning a stall bedded with straw, use a mental pitchfork.
    When dealing with shavings, use a plastic pitchfork. 
  • Move everything that’s clean into the back and corners of the area,
    and toss everything that’s dirty towards the door.
    The more clean bedding you’re able to reuse, the more money you save.
  • Rake out the dirty section and place into the manure spreader.
    Use a shovel to pick up any bits that may have fallen through. 
  • Sweep the center of the stall clean. Let the stall air out and dry.
    Use absorbent deodorizer on any wet spots.
  • Make sure the ground is entirely dry.
    Let your horse wander about all day as it airs out.
    Horses need all the time they can get outdoors.
  • Spread out the remaining clean bedding and add fresh straw if needed.
    Now you’re welcome to let your friend back in. 

DIY: Tips for Beginning Horseback Riding

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Carhartt and Horses

Tips for Beginning Horseback Riding
  1. Reach out to others. Horseback riding is a lot more fun with other people, and they have a lot they can teach you. The best way to improve is to listen to someone more knowledgeable than you, practice, and if possible, have them critique you. Never think that you can’t learn more. The easiest way to do this is by finding an instructor.
  2. Invest in a helmet. Make sure to get one that is ASTM/SEI-approved. This is one of the most important investments you can make. Horses are large and can be unpredictable, and that helmet can save your life.
  3. Wear the appropriate clothing. Long pants and boots are crucial. Bare legs can often lead to chaffing. Never wear open toed shoes. Boots are preferred because they give you traction and a slight heel can keep your foot from sliding around in the stirrup. Make sure the boots don’t have a steel toe. Check out Ellen’s riding outfit pictured above: Carhartt Women’s Briarwood Shirt, Marlinton Vest, & Original-Fit Canvas Crawford Dungaree.
  4. Introduce yourself to your horse. Make sure they can see you and that you don’t startle them. Extend your hand slowly towards his nose so he can smell you first. It’s like saying hello in horse language.
  5. Never assume that your horse is completely, 100% safe. No matter how trained he is or how well you get along, horses are prey animals first. They are going to act like that from time to time. It is better to always be ready than to assume everything will be fine. This is where that helmet can come in handy.
  6. Stay in open areas at first. Avoid low hanging branches, holes in the ground, and other obstacles until you’re more comfortable. The ball of your foot should rest in the stirrup. Hold the reins evenly with a slight bit of slack. Don’t hold the reins too tight, or you will hurt the horse’s mouth. Loosen up and let your body move with the horse. Keep your back straight and don’t hold your breath.
That sounds like a lot to remember, but just take things one step at a time. You’ll start to get the hang of it. You won’t be perfect overnight. Be patient with your horse and don’t forget to enjoy yourself.

“but I don’t think I would be near as happy working 9-5 in a suit”

Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt

Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt
Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt

Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt

Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt
Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt

Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt

Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt

Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt

Josey Butler rodeo and Carhartt

Meet Josey Butler. She grew up on a rural Missouri cattle farm and now lives and works in Texas, training horses and competing in rodeos. Josey is a fireball if I’ve ever met one. So much skill and determination flow from her as she steps into the arena. She’s confident and bold. Her horses knows who’s boss. She’s authoritative and filled with compassion and understanding at the same time. The relationship with a horse and his master is so complex and unlike anything else. When I asked Josey to explain that connection to me, I was blown away by her response.

“Being the weird horse girl growing up has taken me places nationally a lot of people will never see. It’s extremely hard work, people think you just ride horses all day, and there is so much more too it than that. You have to be a part time vet and part time therapist to a 1200 lb animal who can’t just tell you what’s wrong. You have to be a carpenter, plumber, electrician, and mechanic because things don’t always malfunction during business hours, and running a horse training facility relies on all those things daily. You’re also an accountant and secretary because the government still wants taxes, and there is an amazing amount of paperwork involved in both billing and accounts payable when your entering events and such. On the other hand when you’re recieving checks, or an award for a job well done for a client, or even just sitting on a great horse at the end of the day, watching the sunset– it’s unbelievably satisfying. Most people who train in the horse industry never end up on the cover of Forbes but I don’t think I would be near as happy working 9-5 in a suit.”

A life and career driven by passion and a solid work ethic is worth the sweat. Find what drives you and make it happen. Be grateful for the little things you do day-to-day that remind you why you’ve chosen the path you’re on. Find joy in the sunsets.

see Josey’s work gear here: Carhartt Women’s Norfolk Henley, Marlinton Vest, & Carhartt Women’s Jasper Jeans

Meghann of Upland Hills Farm

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm and Carhartt

Upland Hills Farm in Michigan was founded in 1960 by Knight and Dorothy Webster. They hoped to teach an increasingly urban society about the joys and benefits of a rural life. Through day camps and farm visits, the Websters share their beautiful land and the lessons they’ve learned from mother nature. Years ago, Meghann, pictured above, often visited Upland Hills Farm, learning about and enjoying the great outdoors. She now works as a farm hand. Her connection with the farm has come full circle. Meghan once went to learn about how great farm life can be, and now she’s helping spread that enlightenment with others.

Check out Meghan’s great Carhartt work gear here: Rockford Insulated WindbreakerForce Performance T-ShirtStraight-Fit Slim Jean, Women’s Wellington Boots, & Copper Harbor Hat 

Spring 2014 Lookbook

Crafted in Carhartt

Crafted in Carhartt

Crafted in Carhartt

Crafted in Carhartt

Crafted in Carhartt

Crafted in Carhartt

Remember Claire from Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan a few weeks back? Her story is featured in the Carhartt Spring 2014 Lookbook. Posted above are a few more behind the scene shots of Claire and Dixie. Make sure to check out the sneak preview of the Spring line here. The Jasper Jeans are available now! With Work-Flex™ durable stretch technology, they are perfect for a work day that’s filled with bending, crawling, and climbing. You may have heard about Carhartt Force already. Its stain resistant and moisture wicking material make it perfect for work. It will soon be available in a polo T-shirt with a great shape and color.

Michigan Rodeo Queen Claire

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Willowbrooke Farms in Michigan

Horses can be the best of friends. Just ask Claire.
She’s been riding since childhood.
Claire has seen the bond between girl and horse firsthand.
It’s a relationship of mutual respect, trust, and love.
Now she and her horse Dixie participate in competitions all over Michigan.
Claire knows that horses will always be a part of her life.

Check out Claire’s outfit here: Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Kenai Parka, Norfolk Henley, Slim Fit Nyona Jean, & Wellington Boots 

Carmella of City Farm in Chicago

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

City Farm Chicago and Carhartt

Fresh fruits and veggies, right in the middle of the city! City Farm in Chicago takes land that isn’t being used and turns into a productive space. It’s all about sustainability, healthy living, and giving back to the community. This is Carmella, lover of the outdoors. She’s worked at City Farm for the past 3 seasons. Sun kissed skin is proof that working in the midst of nature is good for the body and soul. Carmella always finds a way to work outside, even in the dead of Chicago winters. That’s determination. When it comes down to it, we’d all rather be working in dirt that stuck in a cubicle. Who better to help you get the job done than Carhartt? Carmella is sporting Carhartt Force. A new line that is stain resistant, repels odor, and sweat wicking. It’s perfect for those summer days with your knees firmly planted in the mud while you harvest a beautiful batch of tomatoes.

Megan from the Cotton Gin in Lubbock

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Texas farm life

Farm blood runs thick. Just ask Megan. She works in her family’s cotton gin in Lubbock, Texas. From bud to bale, they makes sure to their product is up to par. Carhartt helps them get the job done, whether they’re covered in mud in an irrigation ditch or spending time on time out on the land.

shop Megan’s look here: women’s Medford jacketSignature Teewomen’s Medford bib overallEl Paso cropped pantCalumet Tee, & Huron shirtTomboy hooded vestWellington boot 

The Women of Dalby Ranch in Post, Texas

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

Ranch life and Carhartt

In ranch life, family is everything. Just ask the ladies of Dalby Ranch in Post, Texas. Since it’s beginning in 1901, it’s been around for 5 generations. To beat the Texas heat, the girls are wearing Carhartt Force shirts. Working outdoors in southern temperatures can be pretty intense, so the moisture wicking technology and stain releasing fabrics of Force make the workday more enjoyable. We’re sure a little dirt and sweat never scared you before, but with Force on your side, it won’t even cross your mind.