Free Fall DIY-ing

Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt
Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt

Bringing the Outdoors In / Crafted in Carhartt

There is so much to appreciate about fall: crisp air and crunchy footsteps, soft earthy tones and speckled foliage. It marks the start of bonfire season and cuddle-up in-warm-blankets season. I’m a big proponent of surrounding oneself with the great outdoors. That being said, it feels natural to pluck up a few flowers from the yard and put them in a vase, but what about leaves? They can be just as lovely, with free flowing branches and freshly turned hues. Why not give it a try? It’s a free way to decorate for the season and it challenges you to see the beauty in what most consider mundane.

what I wore: Carhartt Women’s Belton Shirt & Carhartt Women’s Series 1889 Sim-Fit Double Front Denim Dungaree 

 

 

 

Murdoch’s Ranch & Home Supply Store in Bozeman

Murdoch's in Bozeman Montana / Carhartt Women

Murdoch's in Bozeman Montana / Carhartt Women

Murdoch's in Bozeman Montana / Carhartt Women

Murdoch's in Bozeman Montana / Carhartt Women

Murdoch's in Bozeman Montana / Carhartt Women

Murdoch's in Bozeman Montana / Carhartt Women

Murdoch's in Bozeman Montana / Carhartt Women

Murdoch's in Bozeman Montana / Carhartt Women

After spending a week in Montana, you’re never quite the same. I just got back from a road trip across the beautiful state in search of hardest working women around. The talent I discovered and the beautiful scenery I took in blew me away.
Murdoch’s Ranch & Home Supply Store, based out of Bozeman, was designed with the ranchers’ needs in mind. From extra large parking spots out front to the down to earth staff inside, every detail of the store invites you stick around and enjoy the shopping experience. I was able to outfit 19 women in Carhartt gear at Murdoch’s so that they’d be ready for a hard days’ work. In the weeks to come, I’ll be sharing each one of these Montanans’ stories with you.

Take a closer look at Murdoch’s and find a store near you. You can even live chat with a ranch hand for advice and tips. 

Floriole Olive Oil Granola Recipe

Floriole Cafe and Bakery / Olive Oil Granola Recipe

Floriole Cafe and Bakery / Olive Oil Granola Recipe

Floriole Cafe and Bakery / Olive Oil Granola Recipe
Floriole Cafe and Bakery / Olive Oil Granola Recipe
Floriole Cafe and Bakery / Olive Oil Granola Recipe
Floriole Cafe and Bakery / Olive Oil Granola Recipe
Floriole Cafe and Bakery / Olive Oil Granola Recipe
FLORIOLEgranolaMIX12

With fall just around the corner, it’s raining pumpkin seeds! Sandra Holl, from Floriole Cafe and Bakery in Chicago, shared her recipe for a killer fall granola. It’s so tasty, you’ll hardly believe it’s good for you.

What you need: 
3 cups of rolled oats (not quick-cooking)
1 cup of pumpkin seeds (a.k.a. pepitas)
ÂĽ cup of flax seed
Âľ cup of grade B maple syrup
½ cup of olive oil (if your olive oil has a strong flavor, use ¼ cup of olive oil and ¼ cup of neutral oil like grapeseed or sunflower)
Âľ tsp. of fine sea salt
½ tsp. of cinnamon
½ tsp. of ground ginger
½ cup of dried cherries
ÂĽ cup of chopped dates
Âľ cup of toasted pecans
(serves 8)

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 325°. Line a baking sheet with a Silpat or oiled parchment paper.
2. In a bowl, combine all ingredients except for cherries, and dates. Mix until homogenous.
3. Spread mixture onto the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes.
4. Remove from oven and stir. Bake 20 minutes more and stir again.
5. Let the granola cool for 20 minutes. Scrape into a large bowl.
6. When it’s cooled completely, add cherries, pecans and chopped dates. Store in a sealed container in a cool, dry place for up to a month.

Sandra is wearing: Carhartt Women’s Minot Shirt, 1889 Slim Double-Front Denim Dungaree, & Rapid City Utility Work Apron.

 

 

Bukola, MFA Applied Craft + Design Student

Bukola Paper Art BUKOLApaperART2
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Momigami with Bukola / Crafted in Carhartt

Walking into Bukola’s studio space at the MFA Applied Craft + Design Program in Portland is like crossing the doormat into a treasured family room. Memories and swatches of inspiration dangle from the walls. Every bit of art is handcrafted with care and intent. You get the feeling that a story is begging to be unraveled. Many of the photographs displayed in Bukola’s workspace are of her family. It was clear to me that she draws much of her inspiration from them. Read from Bukola’s perspective how her path led her to this point:

“I come from a close and wonderful family. I grew up in Lagos, Nigeria with my parents, Adeyinka and Kolawole Koiki, and I am the oldest of my mother’s four children. I was always the arty kid growing up, always in a corner drawing pictures or making things. My parents didn’t quite know what to make of me I think, and while it was highly unlikely the kid of middle class Nigerians would end up being an artist, I was suddenly given the opportunity to come to the USA and attend school here to pursue that path. While it must have been hard to send your teenager off across the world on her own, I think my parents must have been relieved frankly, that I would finally get an outlet for my interests. They and my siblings have been nothing but supportive and I get so much inspiration from them because they are all creative in their own right.

My mother has a tailoring business and can make sewing patterns from scratch in minutes. My father is land surveyor and I’m pretty sure I got my eye for detail from him. My immediate younger brother, Tunde has fulfilled his long held dream of becoming a sportscaster on both radio and TV and is a hilarious mimic. The brother after him, Yemi, is currently pursing writing, producing, and performing music as a rap artist. Last but not least, the baby of our family, Busola, is a lawyer whose aptitude for leadership and problem solving is inspiring and is currently pursuing work in international law. I was raised by wonderful parents who managed to provide us with an interesting upbringing and a fantastic education from the little they had. It is my goal in life to honor their sacrifices for my siblings and myself by living the best and most successful life I can.

I originally landed in Texas straight from Nigeria. That was some culture shock I tell you! I first attended community college in Houston, and then transferred to the University of North Texas in Denton to attend their challenging Communication Design Program. I graduated with a BFA in 2006, worked in advertising for a while, but like many people, got laid off with the economic downturn.

I took the opportunity to go back to Nigeria for three whole months and fell in love with the tactility of life there all over again. While the Western notion of fast fashion and disposable commodities is slowly creeping in, there are still a lot of things that people make by hand in Nigeria. While at home, I renewed my deep appreciation for Nigerian textiles such as our wax prints, hand woven strip cloth (Aso Oke) and our indigo dyed cloth (Adire). I enjoy the tactile subtleties of different types of cloth and the graphic designer in me is obsessed with the color and patterns of surface designs.

When I came back to the US, I immediately started taking classes in sewing and bookbinding. In between freelance gigs I also worked at a paper goods store where I learned a lot about handmade paper from around the world. Thus my love for my other passion paper was born. I came to the Applied Craft+Design program because frankly I was not happy being another person pushing pixels around in an office.”

What a story indeed. Bukola and her family have made sacrifice after sacrifice so she could chase her dreams. That’s what we all want, isn’t it? We’re all driven by something: be it textiles and paper, crafting with our hands, or fueling that creative fire that burns in our minds. Muster together the courage to take the steps that get you just a bit closer to your goals. Like Bukola, maybe you can find a path to self-discovery mirrored in your roots and heritage.

Take a look at the photos above to see Bukola lead us through Momigami. This Japanese technique of kneading paper to create a pliable sheet of paper that can be used to make paper clothing, book covers, textile art and much more. Depending on the characteristics of the original paper, you can get a range of lovely end textures: everything from a soft cloth like feel to textures akin to leather.

What you need: newspapers (the more illustrations, diagrams, or patterns—the better), olive oil, a plastic sheet to protect your work area, a small brush, and PVA Glue (that’s an archival glue used in bookbinding and paper projects you can find at your local craft store)

DIY MOMIGAMI:
With your surface protected, pour some olive oil into a small bowl and scoop up enough to evenly coat your palms when you rub your hands together. Take your chosen sheet of paper and fold the four corners into the center, crumpling the dry sheet gently first into a loose ball and then slowly squeezing and wrinkly it carefully but firmly into a tighter ball.

To accelerate the distressing, you can use the slickness of the protective plastic to  “knead” the paper ball against your work surface. Unfold the sheet and repeat the wrinkling, crumpling and knead processor up to three or four minutes, stopping to coat your hand in more olive oil as needed. Open the sheet up and then rub it between your palms or flatten it out onto the work surface while rubbing the sheet down by applying pressure with your hands in an outward direction from the center of the sheet.

The crumpling, rubbing and stretching may be repeated as many times as you would like until you have achieved your preferred texture. Embrace any tears in the paper as opportunities for creativity. Individual sheets can be incorporated into textile art projects by machine sewing, hand stitching or using them in decoupage.

To create a large wall hanging piece instead, using a little brush, apply a thin layer of PVA (polyvinyl acetate) glue to the edge of your paper and adhere them together in a pleasing configuration. You can hang your creation from a wooden dowel rod or explore other creative hanging solutions like use vintage pant hangers.

*Please note that the kneaded paper will still be oily for a long while after, so you should hang your finished piece out and away from the wall to avoid oil stains.

Bukola’s work wear: Carhartt Women’s Huron Shirt, Calumet V-Neck T-Shirt, Slim-Fit Nyona Jean, & Acrylic Watch Hat

Tiny House Builder, Katy Anderson

Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately
Tiny Houses and Living Deliberately

Many of us have formed an attachment to the idea of home. The American Dream is often linked with those ideals and hopes that have been programmed into our brains since childhood. However, giant houses covered with freshly painted shutters and a white picket fence may no longer be the dream of the masses. It’s cliché enough in its descriptive form to turn us off just by mentioning it.
There is a movement of tiny house dwellers sweeping the nation. People who are driven by the notion that more material gain isn’t the bearer of happiness. As Henry David Thoreau would say, it’s the desire to “live deliberately.”
Meet Katy Anderson, a very talented Portland woodworker. She’s in the process of building a tiny home for author, Dee Williams. You may have heard of Dee’s book, The Big Tiny, which documents her adventure of living in an 84 sq. foot home on wheels.
Katy says the sense of fulfillment that comes from building a tiny house is tremendously gratifying. Given its scale, one can afford to spend more time and give greater attention to detail. Higher quality materials can also be used because less is needed. Instead of the desire for more, more, more, it comes down to what you really need and what you really want in your home and everyday life.

“I thought I’d find something in all of this, and I got more than I bargained for. I discovered a new way of looking at the sky, the winter rain, the neighbors, and myself; and a different way of spending my time. Most important, I stumbled into a new sort of “happiness,” one that didn’t hinge on always getting what I want but rather, on wanting what I have. It’s the kind of happiness that isn’t tied so tightly to being comfortable (or having money and property), but instead is linked to a deeper sense of satisfaction—to a sense of humility and gratitude, and a better understanding of who I am in my heart.
I know this sounds cheesy, and in fact, it sounds fairly similar to the gobbledygook that friends have thrown at me just after having their first baby. But the facts are the facts: I found a certain bigness in my little house—a sense of largeness, freedom, and happiness that comes when you see there’s no place else you’d rather be.” -Dee Williams
Katy’s work wear: Carhartt Women’s Force Performance T-Shirt, Clarksburg Quarter-Zip Sweatshirt, Women’s Series 1889 Slim Double-Front Denim Dungaree, & Carhartt Women’s Dearborn Belt

DIY: Ombre Eggs

DIY ombre easter eggs / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY ombre easter eggs / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY ombre easter eggs / Crafted in Carhartt
DIY ombre easter eggs / Crafted in Carhartt

DIY ombre easter eggs / Crafted in Carhartt
guide to ombre

I’ve found that having a little background knowledge in color theory goes a long way when trying to create the ombre effect. Ombre eggs are a great craft for this time of year. Here’s what you need: a few dozen eggs (either hard boiled or paper), paint, brushes, and metallic ink. Pick the base hue you want to start with. Then decide if you want to add white, black, or both to get the desired affect. Once the paint has dried on the eggs, sprinkle the metallic ink on the surface to make them look speckled. Display them in a way that shows the variance of color and your set! If you’re stuck getting started, look for creativity in other places. My color thought process was inspired by this great Carhartt Tee.

DIY: WIRE WORDS

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Crafted in Carhartt DIY: wire words

Valentine’s Day can be a very divisive topic. You love it or you hate it. It does feel like a very commercial holiday that pointlessly makes us buy tons of things covered in little pink and red hearts and end the night with a self-indulgent candy binge. I’ve never been a fan of store bought cards or heart-shaped chocolate boxes. But boy do I love a good old fashioned handcrafted sentiment. That’s why these wire words are the perfect craft for this time of year. Give them as a gift or simply use them in your own home as decoration. This year, make something from the heart to remind those you hold dear how much they mean to you. Go ahead, state the obvious.

“The most important things to say are those which often I did not think necessary for me to say- because they were too obvious.” -Andre Gide

take a look at my crafting outfit: Script Logo Tee, 1889 Double Front Dungaree, & Sandstone Berkley Jacket

 

Meet Kelly Pepper and Kelly McDermott of Habitat for Humanity

MINNEAPOLIShabitatFORhumanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Minneapolis Habitat for Humanity

Meet Kelly Pepper and Kelly McDermott. Both girls are originally from Texas, so we had common ground right at the start. Working in Minneapolis can be a bit chillier than what we’re used to, but that’s alright when you’re bundled up in the right clothes. Pictured above is the Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity Women’s Build Team. That’s where women from across the world help build homes for others in need. Pretty cool if you ask me. These two girls blew me away with how much they knew about construction. It’s all about working from the ground up. You might feel overwhelmed in the beginning, but it’s a learning process every day.
Kelly Pepper is a Construction Volunteer Facilitator and has lived all over the world. She stumbled across the job, and figured she’d give it a go since she’d never been to Minnesota. Kelly loves working with her hands, community development, and helping others, so the job has been a great fit. Kelly McDermott is a ABWK Volunteer Facilitator. It’s a lot of hard labor, tedious, and tiring tasks that add up to such great fulfillment to a huge need. Kelly mentioned that she hoped to merge the work experience she’s gained from construction with her degree in the arts into something that can inspire, empower, and support others. If you ask me, she’s doing it already. The team pours so much of their soul and time into these homes. The craftsmanship of construction is such a beautiful art form, especially when it is mixed with the goodness of a giving heart. See how you can get involved in a Women’s Build. Let’s strive to be a community of women that seek to strengthen one another instead of competing or pulling each other down.

Kelly Pepper’s outfit: Carhartt Women’s Quick Duck Woodward Jacket, Women’s Force Performance Quarter-Zip Shirt, Women’s Series 1889 Slim Double Front Dungaree, & Acrylic Watch Hat / Kelly McDermott’s outfit: Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Berkley Vest, Women’s Force Performance Quarter-Zip Shirt, Women’s Series 1889 Slim Double Front Dungaree, & Women’s Quincy Hat 

Minneapolis Ceramic Artist Ginny

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny Sims Pottery

Ginny specializes in functional domestic pottery, essentially pieces meant for the home with a specific purpose. The idea that memories and home can stir up an interesting conversation for everyone drives her work. No matter what thoughts or recollections you bring into your home and kitchen, there is something about using items that are made by hand. It’s another connection, another conversation to be had. There is such a story to be told in a piece of handmade pottery. You can feel the grooves, the intent, and the beauty in such a way that inspires you. See more of Ginny’s work here.

check out this great throwing outfit: Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Mock-Neck Sherpa Lined Vest, Linwood Chambray Shirt, & Original-Fit Canvas Crawford Dungaree

DIY Using Nature in Holiday Decorations

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

DIY pine cone wreath

For last minute decorations this holiday season, just step outside and integrate aspects of nature into your trimming. This is a great activity to do with kids. It will get the wheels turing in their heads and keep them active. What do you have lying around the house that can add to the festivities? Maybe some ornaments, ribbon for wrapping gifts, and pine cones collected from the backyard can do the trick. Use thin string or wire to tie your found objects onto the wreath. Check out Ellen and Elle’s creation. Decorating is fun for the whole family. Get outside and enjoy the season with the ones you love.

Ellen’s outfit: Carhartt Women’s Active Jac, Women’s Clarksburg Sweatshirt, Original Fit Canvas Crawford Dungaree, & Watch Hat / Elle’s outfit: Girl’s Redwood Jacket, Girl’s Brushed Fleece Sweatshirt, Girl’s Micro-Washed Canvas Pant, & Kid’s Watch Hat