Force Equator Jacket

Carhartt rainwear
Carhartt rainwear
Carhartt rainwear
Pashon Murray Detroit Dirt
Pashon Murray Detroit Dirt

There are some days work has to be done, come rain or come shine. Carhartt Women’s Force Equator Jacket’s got you covered. The lightweight material makes it easy for you to move around and get the job done. A Storm Defender™ waterproof breathable membrane keeps you cool and dry. Normally, you’d be working up a sweat, but the FastDry™ technology wicks away moisture and even fights odors. The waterproof seams, three piece hood, zippered pockets, and adjustable cuffs keep the weather at bay so you can focus on the task at hand. There’s even a media port so your phone or ipod can stay safe and dry. This jacket has it all and then some.

Pashon Murray from Detroit Dirt is wearing the Force Equator Jacket as she works at her compost site. Pashon is a powerhouse and a visionary. She was on Newsweek’s list of disruptive women in 2014. In other words, she’s a female entrepreneur making an impact in her community. Pashon collects compost that would normally be thrown away around the city. She then uses it to make soil that can be used as a fertile base in community gardens and the urban farming movement. Pashon’s work is bringing Detroit one step closer to rebuilding the area into an environmentally conscious and proud, self-sustaining city.

take a look at Pashon’s workwear: Carhartt Women’s Force Equator Jacket, Sibley Denim Cropped Pant, Women’s Wellington Boot, & Carhartt Women’s Soft Hands Gloves

DIY: Mossy Bookend

DIY Mossy Bookend on Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Mossy Bookend on Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Mossy Bookend on Crafted in CarharttDIY Mossy Bookend on Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Mossy Bookend on Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Mossy Bookend on Crafted in Carhartt
DIY Mossy Bookend on Crafted in Carhartt
If there’s a word that epitomizes Portland, it’s green. There are so many different shades everywhere: in the tree line, on mossy rocks, bushes, grass, and natural growth.  That’s only heightened by the human eye’s ability to differentiate shades of green more than any other color. I got back from my week long trip to Portland, and I found myself missing the intensity of the hues I saw in Oregon. I challenged myself to bring back the moss from last week’s very Portland-esque DIY and incorporate into my own home. I loved the sharp contrast of the marshmallow colored Carhartt Women’s Minot Shirt and the ever vibrant greens, so I carried the theme even further and let them play off one another once again.

I’ll walk to you though the steps to make your own mossy bookend. You’ll need a cross section of a tree, self-adhesive moss paper, clumps of moss, baby’s breath, mini diorama trees, hot glue gun, scissors, and a pencil. Take the tree section and trace the top of it on the back of the moss paper. Cut the circle out and stick it to the top of the wood. Then glue the trees and little clumps of moss in the center. Cut off little bits of baby’s breath and add it in where you think a pop of buds is needed. You’re ready to use it! Enjoy the feeling of mother nature while you’re hanging in your home.

How Seasons Can Affect Horses

how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt

I don’t know about you, but this never-ending winter is getting to me. Have you ever wondered how seasons can affect your animals? I did a little reading on how the year’s changes can bring about certain transformations in horses. Here are some tidbits of what I learned:

Spring
expedites the growth of grass. Again, you’ll see spikes in potassium and nitrates. The warmer temperatures and damp conditions are prime for fungus producing myco-toxins. Watch out for Rye Grass staggers. With the increased grass, your horse can gain weight. Too much weight gain can put your horse at risk for type 2 diabetes. If you fear your horse is eating too much, a grazing muzzle may be your solution.

Summer climates allow grass growth to continue. Again, spikes in potassium and nitrates should be on your mind. Horses tend to be more relaxed during dry summers. Always have drinking water readily available. Just like humans, horses need more water on hotter days.

Autumn brings a big change in grass, often with lower sodium content and higher potassium and nitrate levels. Fungus can thrive during this season too, possibly producing myco-toxins. Take head if your horse is ill or starts to stagger. They may need to be moved to a safer spot with better conditions. When the soil is wet for a long period of time, your horse can feel tender footed after rain.

Winter slows the growth of grass, which will help lower levels of potassium and nitrates. In some cases, grass will even become dormant. Horses burn more magnesium during colder months. Make sure you are still providing the vitamins and minerals found in hard feed (especially calcium and magnesium).  Keep your horse warm and dry. Horse safe hay is great for this.

All in all, keep an eye on your horse for any changes in behavior. If you can make them more comfortable, do so. Make sure to seasonally adjust their diets so that they receive the nutrition they may lack at certain times of the year. Here’s to hoping spring comes swiftly, but for now you should bundle up.

Check out Alison‘s work wear here: Carhartt Women’s Sandstone Berkley Jacket, Dartford Denim Shirt, & Jasper Jeans

DIY: Moss Sign

DIY moss sign

DIY moss sign

DIY moss sign

DIY moss sign

DIY moss sign

DIY moss sign

DIY moss sign

DIY moss sign

DIY moss sign
It’s that simple. Do what you love. If you’re crafty and love finding ways to bring nature into your living space, this DIY project is calling your name. You can pick up these supplies at your local craft store. It’s quick, simple, and to the point.

What you need: adhesive moss paper, a tree ring, an inspirational quote, pencil, sharpie, and scissors 

1. Pick out a quote that inspires you.
2. Type it up on a computer, mirror it horizontally so that it reads backwards.
3. Cover the back of the paper in graphite so you can transfer the letters to the back of the moss paper.
4. Flip the paper right side up (so that it reads backwards again), place it on the back of the moss paper, and trace the letters.
5. Your quote should appear backwards on the adhesive side of the moss sheet.
6. Trace over the graphite with a sharpie so you don’t smudge the tracing off while cutting.
7. Cut the letters out.
8. Peel and stick to the wooden palette.
And you’re done!

check out my crafting outfit here: Traverse City Hoodie & Straight Fit Slim Jean